The small, the mighty, the Red-breasted Nuthatch!

The Red-breasted Nuthatch is one of our smallest birds here in B.C. at just about 4 or 5in in length. That puts them around the same size as kinglets. However small they are in stature, however, they certainly make up for it by their presence.

I think of them as miniature woodpeckers of a kind. And if you’ve ever heard a nuthatch drumming on a tree like I have, you’ll know they can be surprisingly noisy. The first time I noticed a Red-breasted Nuthatch after hearing it pecking a tree, I felt surprised that something so small could make so much noise!

redbreastednuthatch
The Red-breasted Nuthatch climbing along a garry oak tree. Their plumage is distinct with their orange breast, slate-blue back and black-and-white crown.

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Fun with feeder birds

Last year, I got my first bird-feeder and put it out for the winter. It took some time for birds to show up at first, but once they did, there was no going back! This winter, the birds have returned to it much more quickly! The last few weeks, there have been lots of visitors.

male Dark-eyed Junco

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Winter birds in the yard and the beach

Christmas morning, Victoria woke up to a white Christmas. It had snowed the evening before as the sun fell, muffling the world in a crisp silence, the only sound the crunching beneath my feet when I went outside for a walk. When I first got up and looked out the window, a Barred Owl had landed in the trees in the backyard. I’ve seen this owl around a couple of times (presuming he is the same one) before and heard it call at night, but never managed to have my camera nearby at the right moment! I watched him in this different, snow-covered landscape until he flew away. What a wonderful way to start the day!

Barred Owl in the backyard Christmas morning

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Notes on backyard birding with a surprise

The other morning, I found something exciting in my backyard just outside my window. I first noticed a bird flying around under the porch and around one of the posts. Then, I saw the nest – a Dark-eyed Junco nest!

a junco nest under the porch!

The day before, I’d sat watching the junco in the garden calling out chip notes as she moved from perch to perch. At the time, I didn’t notice the nest or it wasn’t there yet. After I noticed the nest, I watched the junco work on building it; flying over to a brush pile and collecting bits of grass in her beak.

I think she must be a female because, according to Cornell, the females build the nest and chooses the site. With a 12 to 13 day incubation period, I’ll have to keep my eyes out in a few days.

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